Two Fearless Champions of the Environment
YANA Town Hall
The Yale Club of New York City
In-Person & Virtual
Wednesday, January 26 | 6:30 PM EST
All welcome to attend; Registration required
Urban parks and natural areas have never been more important for our collective sanity than during Covid. On January 26th, two alums from the Yale School of the Environment – Sarah Charlop-Powers ’09 MEM and Georgia Silvera-Seamans ’01 MEM – will describe what they and their organizations are doing to protect our urban ecosystems and the biodiversity that inhabit them.
We hope you can join us for what promises to be a compelling discussion moderated by YANA’s Executive Director Rachel Littman ‘91.

REGISTER HERE

Co-sponsored by YANA & Yale Blue Green


NOTES:
  • Please indicate when registering if you will attend in-person or virtually
  • Details regarding COVID protocol at the Yale Club are noted on the registration page
  • Those who are attending in person are invited to gather for drinks in the Main Lounge after the Town Hall concludes at 7:30pm

Sarah Charlop-Powers is the co-founder and executive director of the Natural Areas Conservancy (NAC), a nonprofit dedicated to managing New York City’s 20,000 acres of forests and wetlands. The NAC is a pioneer in the field of urban conservation, using data and science to develop new ways to manage urban natural areas so that they provide recreation opportunities for diverse users, protect biodiversity, and provide environmental benefits. Sarah has a BA in Economics from Binghamton University and an MEM from the Yale School of Forestry.
Georgia Silvera-Seamans lives and breathes city trees–with field experience in New Haven, Boston, Oakland, and NYC, and a dissertation about urban forestry policy in Northern California cities. Georgia’s research has been published in Urban Forestry & Urban Greening and Arboriculture & Urban Forestry. She is the founder of Local Nature Lab and directs Washington Square Park Eco Projects where she designs urban ecology programs for New Yorkers of all ages. Georgia also writes about trees with bylines in City Trees and about birds with articles at Popular Science and Audubon.